All Things Alice: It’s Alice’s Day! Calloo Callay!

Everyone’s gone Alice mad! It’s been 150 years since Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland was first published.  And on Saturday July 4th it’s Alice’s Day in Oxford. In honour of this frabjous occasion I’m doing a series of posts about all things Alice…

It’s Alice’s Day!

On this day, many, many years ago Charles Dodgson told the first Alice story to Alice Liddell and her sisters.  The day is recorded in his diary and later immortalised in the poem “All in the Golden Afternoon” which prefaces Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.

Fittingly, it was one of those hot, blue-skied days when the buildings of Oxford are truly golden, throwing back the heat and the light of the sun all afternoon.  Today, the city was crammed with Wonderland-themed events and people wearing all kinds of fabulous costumes. As I wandered through the town I passed an elderly gentleman (walking very quickly and definitely not stopping for pictures) in a purple suit and a purple top hat, a young couple dressed as Tweedle-dum and Tweedle-dee, a small child in a pram dressed as a a Cheshire Cat and about a thousand Alices of all kinds.  There are public performances and readings; a giant chess-set in a shopping centre; and, of course, the lobster quadrille danced in front of the Museum of Natural History (where you can visit the Dodo and all the other wonderland creatures including Bill the lizard)

I made a beeline for the Dali, Tenniel & Printing Alice exhibit at the Weston library

Photo by @RareBooksOfBod

Photo by @RareBooksOfBod

There’s a display case showing rare first editions of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland – including the first printing of the book which was suppressed (much like the mouse in the courtroom scene) after Tenniel complained about the shoddy quality of the prints. Dodgson didn’t seem to have noticed the poor quality of the print and he’d already posted out 50 copies of the book to his friends.  He had to ask for them back and then, rather than waste them, sent the book out to children’s homes and charities. The copy displayed in the Weston now had been sent to St. Raphael’s in Torquay and was later donated to the Bodleian by the writer Roger Lancelyn Green.

The first edition of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

The first edition of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

Later editions of Alice are shown alongside so you can see the difference in the quality of the print – Dodgson later recouped some of the money he lost on the first edition by selling the bad prints to an American publisher – the first American edition (shown below) has the shoddy prints:

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The first American edition of Alice – New York, D. Appleton & Co. 1866 (all but the title-page printed at Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1865)

There are some other examples of Tenniel’s work here – including illustrations from Punch magazine and an advertisement for Pear’s Soap which borrows both Alice and the “Beautiful Soup” song:

Tenniel, Pear's Soap advert

Tenniel, Pear’s Soap advert

I was especially delighted to see a full set of Salvador Dali’s illustrations of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland from 1969 on display. I saw these pieces a few years ago on display in Christ Church, Oxford but it is a real treat to see them all together in one case like this. Dali’s colours are incredibly rich and while each piece is beautiful on its own, the repetition of motifs through the series links the images together and creates a narrative that reflects and builds upon Carroll’s words.

Afterwards, I got to have a go of a real printing-press.

The Bodleian’s printing press is a replica made from from designs published in 1683 by Joseph Moxon in Mechanick Exercises, or, The doctrine of handy-works, applied to the art of printing. You can read a facsimile of the third edition of Moxon’s book here and you can try the press yourself on Saturdays all through the summer.

The printing press is a glorious thing! There’s something amazingly physical about it – the stickiness of the ink, the weight of the levers, the sheer bulk of the machine.  You really feel like you’ve achieved something enormous by printing a page – it gave me a sudden insight into how hard printers worked to make books:

For Alice’s Day, you could print a playing card – the type had been made out of wood and lino especially for the occasion and, by the afternoon, the edges of some of the letters had already begun to show signs of wear and tear – I made a King of Hearts card and you can see where the upper arm of the “K” has worn down and it hasn’t quite managed to touch the page.

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My first print

It has a charmingly home-made look, don’t you think? Not bad for a golden afternoon…

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The first post in the series of All Things Alice on my trip to the V&A Museum of Childhood is here.

You can find the second post in the series all about tea, teetotallers and Victorian children’s literature here.

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Imperial War Museum Library at risk

i was greatly saddened to hear that the library at the Imperial War Museum is at risk of closure.  The closure would be a great loss.  A loss of jobs.  And a loss of a valuable and unique resource.  Some of you may have read my early posts about my visit to the archives at the IWM and my attempts to make a genuine Land Girl’s pullover from a vintage pattern.  I still have some patterns that I found in that archive that I need to make (including a cardigan dating from WWI – I had intended to get it done by November 11th but well, the best laid plans of mice and men etc.etc.)  Above all, for me, it is about the loss of stories.  The library and archives offer us the opportunity to connect with the past. And while it might seem from the outside that the collections are all about military history the archives contain all sorts of materials about people who had nothing whatsoever to do with the military but whose lives were, nevertheless, affected by war.  There are stories there – stories about children’s letters home, about people trying to make birthday cakes on rations, about people trying to make snazzy jumpers with as little yarn as possible.

And those stories will be lost too if the library closes.

Here’s the information from the press release.  If you want to help with the campaign to save the IWM library, please sign the petition below and spread the word.

4 November 2014

Imperial War Museum staff launch petition to save its library and services

The Imperial War Museum’s Prospect union branch today launched a petition calling on the government to reverse a £4m cut in annual funding, which has left it facing the closure of its unique library and the loss of 80 jobs, just months after the fanfare of IWM London’s reopening following a £40m refurbishment.

The move comes as the museum – the world’s leading authority on conflict – plays its part in marking the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War.

When Prime minister David Cameron reopened the museum in July 2014 he said “When I launched our plans for the First World War centenary, I said that the renovated Imperial War Museum would be the centrepiece of our commemorations. And what a fitting centrepiece this is – a national focal point in which we can all take great pride.

“You have created something fitting and lasting – something of which we can all be proud.”

Prospect negotiator Andy Bye said: “Closing IWM’s library is not a fitting way to mark the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War. IWM aspires to be a highly respected authority on its subject matter, but this will be impossible without a library.”

IWM London’s library acquired its first item in 1917 and has been a vital part of the museum ever since, playing a key role in helping staff do their jobs whether curating exhibitions or helping them to understand and identify artefacts. It also provides members of the public with access to research materials.

The closure has also been proposed of the ever-popular Explore History facility in London. Open seven days a week it allows the public to explore IWM’s collections and find out about objects and subjects not on display. It attracted 55,000 visitors last year.

School educational visits, led by museum and education professionals, to IWM branches at Duxford, HMS Belfast and the Churchill War Rooms are yet another service under threat.

The possibility of closures and cuts comes at a time when demand for all the museum’s services has never been higher: the IWM attracted 433,000 learners in 2013-14 and 256,000 children took part in its on and off-site educational programmes.

“Prospect fears this is only the start and that further damaging cuts are likely,” added Andy.

The petition is at: http://bit.ly/save_IWM

The prime minister’s speech is at www.gov.uk/government/speeches/reopening-of-the-imperial-war-museum-david-camerons-speech